Posted in involvement, Liberia, orphans, poetry

Singing a Song for Liberia #orphans #ebola

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The Poetry book “A Song for Liberia” is a charity endeavor. Our primary goal is to raise money for those impacted  by the Ebola crisis – the orphans. Liberia has been, by far, the hardest hit area so we will “share our love” via our poetry to orphans there.

Depending on which source you go to, the number of orphans (from ebola)  is a staggering  10,000. A huge percentage of those children are in Liberia – a country that does not have the resources to provide for these orphans. The large funds  that are being donated by organizations are unlikely to offer more than a trickle of assistance to the children as the need (country’s infrastructure) is so vast. Here’s the assistance that I have read about: “An orphan is taken to a household that agrees to house the child. The child is delivered with a mattress, a jug of oil and a bag of flour.” I have also read about children who have been forced to leave their neighborhoods or villages as people are afraid the children will contract Ebola later.

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[One of the orphanage organization that we are speaking  with  is called God’s Kids.  This organization takes no administration fees so every dollar that is raised (after the percentage that Amazon or Smash words takes) will go directly to the care of orphans in Liberia. Check out the website they offer support in the greater Monrovia area of Liberia; There are seven orphanages with a total of approximately 485 children that they support.  In addition, these orphanages offer day school to children in the neighborhood around the facility.]

For the time being, we will move forward with the organization mentioned below as they are doing more in the feeding and housing of displaced Ebola orphans. 

The other organization that we are seriously considering is called Christian Aid Mission. The leader Mr. Cuffee has been in the region for two decades helping orphans. At present, his team is going door to door (in villages) ascertaining needs and trying to find families to give homes to these orphans. The situation is complicated as families are afraid to help family members (let alone strangers). This organization is trying to make food and medical supplies go further and they are in desperate need of funds to stretch their resources. Add to this problem the fact that employment has gone from 40 – 25 percent and the draw on the resources  of organizations such as Christian Aid is staggering. I will  be talking to Christian Aid about making a trip into the Monrovia area later this year.

Needless to say, Liberia was in bad condition before the Ebola outbreak. It’s mind boggling to imagine how hard they were hit with this disease.

The Song for Liberia may seem like only a drop of water in a large bucket of need. However, on a dry day a splash of water is a welcome relief. My hope is we can look back on this project and have a more personal look into the lives of these children. How wonderful it would be to have names and faces of children that we know our effort has directly helped.

Interested in submitting your work? Go here.

Thank you for your consideration of this project.

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“And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

Photographs are from Nick Fraser and the Christian Aid Mission. The little hand belongs to my cousin Zeek who was abandoned by his birth mother in Johannesburg.

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This is a project with one objective to help orphans of Ebola.

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